Sunday, 26 June 2016

VI Sunday after Pentecost A.D 2016

On 26 June 2016, Sixth Sunday after PentecostMass was celebrated at the Parish of the Most Holy Redeemer in the Diocese of Cubao. Assisting were members of the Societas Ecclesia Dei Sancti Ioseph – Una Voce Philippines.


At the prayers at the foot of the altar; at the chanting of the Gospel; and at the Consecration.




Ut in omnibus laudetur Dominus.

Friday, 24 June 2016

Nativity of Saint John the Baptist A.D. 2016

On 24 June 2016, feast of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist, Mass was celebrated at the Parish of the Most Holy Redeemer in the Diocese of Cubao. Assisting were members of the Societas Ecclesia Dei Sancti Ioseph – Una Voce Philippines.


At the Epistle; at the Consecration; and at the Last Gospel.




Ut in omnibus laudetur Dominus.

Singing the gozos

Let us begin with the obvious question: What are gozos? Let us answer this at the linguistic level first. In Spanish, gozos literally mean joys, expressions of gladness. Its etymology is mercifully uncomplicated. The singular of this word traces its origin to the Latin gaudium. The Septem Gaudia Beatæ Mariæ Virginis in Latin, which are the Seven Joys of Mary in English, are called the Siete Gozos de María in Spanish. Often, in Catholic mentality, gaudia exist in duality with dolores, as in the Seven Sorrows of Mary.

Literally, therefore, gozos are ouvertures of rejoicing and exuberance.

Now, our question largely remains unanswered. What, then, are gozos? These are what the blog Gogistes valencians curate in order to spread their use as a treasure of the past. The extent to which this blog has studied, catalogued and promoted the gozos has earned for it the rightful moniker of Gozopedia. 

Gozopedia
(source)

Let us translate the definition provided by the contributors of the blog as to the nature and character of the gozos:
The gozos (Castilian), goigs (Catalan) or gojos (Valencian), are popular poetic compositions that are sung in honour of the Virgin, Christ, or the saints. They are sung in the context of an important religious act, such as the Mass of a great feast, a procession, or the blessing of an image, etc. Its goal is to render thanksgiving for received blessings, or as a entreaty for a petition of protection against evil. Of a written or oral character, they trace their origin back to the Middle Ages, and are preserved in most cases in documents of great artistic value which we are attempting to collect, dignify, and show here.
Historically, devotionally, and artistically, gozos are votive prayers.

Valencian gojos in honour of
Our Lady of Miracles
(source)

Thursday, 23 June 2016

Traditional Filipino novena

The traditional Filipino novena is a direct descendant of the traditional Spanish novena. While it has been largely supplanted in urban places by the shorter set of prayers characteristic of the novena that the American Catholics brought with them, the traditional form is still observed in many rural places in the Philippines, largely untouched even by the slew of reforms that came after Vatican II. We will now attempt here to map its structure and provide a general description of its composition.

Pentecostés
Fray Juan Bautista Maíno, 1612–1614
Museo del Prado

When we speak of novena, what first comes to mind is a set of prayers arduously recited for a period of nine days. The practice of praying a novena itself is founded on Sacred Scriptures. When the Apostles and the Blessed Virgin, with other Christians, enclosed themselves in a room after the Ascension of the Lord, for a period of nine days, until the Paraclete came, they made the first-ever novena.

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Traditional Filipino Sung Rosary

What is the Rosary? A Catholic knowledgeable of his faith and history would probably answer: the psalter of Mary. He might then add that the 150 Hail, Marys equal the number of psalms in Sacred Scriptures. Now, let us skip the analysis and propose that the Rosary was, at some point in history, to layfolk who did not possess a Book of the Hours, a way to sanctify certain hours of the day, pretty much in the same way that the canonical hours set aside hours for prayer. This sounds rather extenuated, but let us overlook that at the moment.

La Virgen del Rosario entre Santo Domingo y San Pedro Mártir
Anónimo, primer tercio del siglo XVI
Museo del Prado

The Divine Office can be recited alone, in common, or chanted in choir. So, therefore, is the Rosary. When missionaries came to the Philippines, ignoring the small pockets of rebellion motivated by religious discontent, they found a people practicing a primitive form of animism. The people were pliant, and soon after were converted. It has been suggested in the field of anthropology that the ease of conversion is due to the fact that the people found parallels between their erstwhile animism and Spanish Catholicism, and that the ceremonies and rituals, buttressed by a preoccupation to to elaborate appurtenances, exerted an extra gravitational pull that facilitated the conversion, and, more importantly, kept the converts in the faith.

Recognising the innate inkling of the inhabitants of the archipelago to chant, the missionaries harnessed their musical skills and taught them votive hymns and canticles. Our ancestors embosomed their new hymns to a point where, at one time, the Synod of Calasiao actually forbade the toleration of the afternoon processions held in honour of the Blessed Virgin, and the singing of the Salve therein, because the Synod Father felt it was bordering on idolatry. Another example would be the zealous application of the rescript of the Sacred Congregation of Rites by the archbishop of Manila, Fray Felipe Pardo, banning altogether the misas de aguinaldo only because the congregants sang carols during the Masses.

We can imagine our forebears in those days. If they were not tilling their fields or finishing household chores, they would be kneeling before the family altar, praying. Grandmothers would gather their grandchildren at the pealing of the Angelus bell, and shoo them into the altar chamber to endure an hour of prayer before supper. Mistresses would chide their maids for failing to procure new candles for the numerous saints encased in solid glass, and to put out new tablecloths for the altars.


It is probably within this backdrop of piety that the Filipino Sung Rosary developed. Locally, it is known as rosario cantado. Because we sometimes confuse grammatical gender in Spanish, the term rosario cantada now also has quite a following. A typical rosario cantado is a five-decade rosary, recited in the vernacular, elaborated with additional Spanish or vernacular prayers and invocations, with some of them sung. There is usually a sung meditation before the mysteries, a sung ejaculation after each decade, another sung meditation after the mysteries, and the final combo of the Salve, Regina and the Litany of Loreto.

Sunday, 12 June 2016

IV Sunday after Pentecost A.D. 2016

On 12 June 2016, Fourth Sunday after Pentecost, Mass was celebrated at the Parish of the Most Holy Redeemer in the Diocese of Cubao. Assisting were members of the Societas Ecclesia Dei Sancti Ioseph – Una Voce Philippines.


During the Canon; and at the distribution of Holy Communion.




After Mass, as was custom in the Philippines during the annual commemoration of our Independence Day, the Te Deum was chanted.


Ut in omnibus laudetur Dominus.

Sunday, 5 June 2016

Our Lady of the Sacred Heart A.D. 2016

On 5 June 2016Third Sunday after Pentecost, first Sunday of June, Mass was celebrated for the feast of Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Patroness of the Parish of the Most Holy Redeemer, at the said Parish, in the Diocese of Cubao. Assisting were members of the Societas Ecclesia Dei Sancti Ioseph – Una Voce Philippines.


During the procession; and during the aspersion of blessed water.




Friday, 3 June 2016

Sacred Heart A.D. 2016

On 3 June 2016, feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Mass was celebrated at the Parish of the Most Holy Redeemer in the Diocese of Cubao. Assisting were some members of the Societas Ecclesia Dei Sancti Ioseph – Una Voce Philippines.


At the prayers at the foot of the altar; at the chanting of the Gospel; during the sermon.